Chronos
Increment Time Controls

 

Increment Time Controls for the Chronos Clock

By Senior TD Ken Ballou
First published: 08-12-2009
Most recently Revised: 08-24-2009

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Two modes for increment time control

  You can use either CH-P1 or CH-P5 for an increment time control. CH-P5 is easier to set up, but CH-P1 shows more clearly that the opponent's time has run out.
    With CH-P5, the opponent's clock will count down to 0:00:00 and then stop.
    With CH-P1, when the opponent's clock counts down to 0:00:00, there are also three bars to the left of the opponent's.

Setting mode CH-P5

  Hold down both the left and right buttons and press the red center button to turn the clock on.
  Press the center button 13 times; CH-P5 will appear on the left.
  The default setting for CH-P5 is G/20+6 (20 minutes plus 6 seconds per move).
  For G/105+30, change this to 1:45:00, 0:30.

Setting mode CH-P1

  Hold down both the left and right buttons and press the red center button to turn the clock on.
  Press the center button 10 times; CH-P1 will appear on the left.
  The default setting for CH-P1 is 40/2, 20/1 (40 moves in two hours, then 20 moves in one hour repeating indefinitely).
  To set the clock for G/105+30, change this to 1/1:45:00, 1/0:00:30.
  That is, the clock displays the first time control as 40-2:00:00 and the second time control as 20-1:00:00.
  Change those to 01-1:45:00 and 01-0:00:30, respectively.
  Be very careful for the last setting. Make sure you set it to 01-0:00:30 [30 seconds] and not 01-0:30:00 [30 minutes]!
  After making this change, keep pressing the red center button until you see "Copy to 0".
  Change the zero to whichever preset you wish, and then press and hold the red center button until the clock beeps.

How to check your clock is set correctly

  Turn the clock on and go to the preset you saved above
  Press the right button
  The left clock will start running immediately (no delay) starting at 1:45:00.
  Let the clock run for five seconds, until the display shows 1:44:55.
  Press the left button.
  The left display should now show 1:45:25 (30 seconds added after the button is pressed), and the right clock should be running.
  Press the right button.
  The left clock will again start running immediately.
  Let it run for five seconds, until the display shows 1:45:20.
  Press the left button.
  Again, 30 seconds should be added to the left clock (now displaying 1:45:50), and the right clock should be running.

How does an increment time control work?

  An increment time control means that after you complete each move, a certain amount of time is added to your clock.
  Unlike a delay time control, your clock starts running immediately. If you have played online, you have probably used an increment time control.
  For example, you might play a game with a time control of "2 12". This means you start the game with two minutes on your clock. Your clock starts running immediately (no delay), and after each move, 12 seconds are added to your remaining time. This sounds like a fast time control, but it is much slower than blitz. (After 60 moves, you would have had actually have had 12 * 60 = 720 seconds [12 minutes] added to your clock, so you would have a total of 14 minutes.)
  One advantage of an increment time control is that if you find yourself in severe time pressure, "blitzing" several moves can help relieve the pressure. If the time control specifies a 30 second increment, you will accumulate almost one full minute for every two moves you play almost instantaneously.
   Increment time controls are still uncommon but are gaining popularity in FIDE events, and the US Chess League (go Boston Blitz!) uses a "90 30" (90 minutes plus 30 seconds/move) time control.
  In the 2009 New England Open ("105 30"), you'll be using a time control of 1 move in 105 minutes followed by a time control of 1 move in 30 seconds that repeats indefinitely.
  Think about an "old style" time control (before sudden death) of 40/2 20/1. That time control means you start the game with two hours on your clock, and you have to make 40 moves before the flag falls.
  After making 40 moves, you keep whatever time is left on your clock, and you add one hour. You then have to make 20 more moves, and then you get another hour. This repeats indefinitely until the game is over.
  Now, apply that to 1/105 minutes, 1/30 seconds. You start the game with 105 minutes on your clock, and you have to make one move before that time runs out. After you make one move, you go to the next time control, and 30 seconds is added to whatever time is left on your clock.
  Then, you have to make one move to reach the second time control; when you do, another 30 seconds is added to your remaining time. So, after every move, 30 seconds is added to your remaining time; that is an "increment" time control.